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similarity
similarity

Among the myriad facets of semantics, one aspect that captivates linguists and language enthusiasts alike is the notion of similarity in senses. There are various kinds of relationships between word senses. Such senses may be identical, similar, or different. The same fact is true about sentence senses. In this essay, we embark on a fascinating journey through the dimensions of synonymy, paraphrase, and hyponymy.—three key avenues where similarity in senses manifests itself in language.

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Levels of meaning
Levels of meaning

Semantics seeks to unravel the mysteries behind how we derive meaning from words, sentences, the intentions of speakers and the conception of the hearers.

In this essay, we embark on a journey to explore the intricate web of language and meaning, focusing on four distinct levels: word meaning, sentence meaning, speaker's meaning and hearer’s meaning.

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Semantic Expressions
Semantic Expressions

In this essay, we continue explaining more crucial semantic concepts such as REFERENCE, REFERENT and SENSE (See Essay No. 6 Important Semantic Expressions)

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Ambiguity of Senses
Ambiguity of Senses

In this essay, we will discuss the nature of lexical ambiguity and sentence ambiguity. ( See Essay No.8 on Levels of Meaning in semantics. )

We will also explore the ways in which these two types of ambiguity can be resolved. Ambiguity is a phenomenon in which a word or a sentence can have multiple possible interpretations.

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Semantic Expressions
Semantic Expressions

The distinction between utterances, sentences, and propositions is vital in semantics (Also, see Essay No. 3 Semantic Roles) because it allows us to talk about different levels of meaning that are involved in language.

In this essay, we’ll show the key differences among three semantic expressions (Also, see Essay No. 2 Lexical Relations) and provide adequate examples that make things clear enough.

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